Jared Harris says U.N.C.L.E. movie is ‘very stylish’

Jared Harris, who has a supporting role in The Man From U.N.C.L.E. movie, described the film as “very stylish” in an interview posted on YouTube on Nov. 12.

“First of all, it’s Guy Ritchie,” Harris said, referring to the movie’s director. “His films always have really good, clever plotting, that funny, great action sequences….It’s a buddy movie, you know, with two huge, fantastic actors in the main roles…I think it has that lovely feel to it because it’s set in the ’60s.”

“It’s going to be very stylish,” Harris also said. “Guy is very stylish.” Harris played Professor Moriarty in one of the Ritchie-directed Sherlock Holmes movies.

Harris plays Sanders in the U.N.C.L.E. movie, who is the CIA controller for Napoleon Solo. Harris said he mostly acted opposite Henry Cavill, playing Solo, the role originated by Robert Vaughn in the 1964-68 television series. Armie Hammer plays Illya Kuryakin, the Russian orignally portrayed by David McCallum.

Overall, not a lot of detail. The movie is scheduled for release in the U.S. in mid-August 2015. Separately (via @laneyboggs2001 on Twitter), Cavill did some U.N.C.L.E. post-production work at BAM Studios in Chicago while filming Batman v. Superman. You can CLICK HERE for details.

You can see the Harris interview for yourself here:

Happy 82nd birthday, Robert Vaughn

Normally, we’d have more to say but we see you’re busy with the party. So we’ll just say here’s to many more.

solonye

Glen A. Larson’s forays into spy television

It Takes a Thief Logo

Glen A. Larson, a prolific writer-producer of U.S. television shows, died Nov. 14, according to AN OBITUARY IN THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER.

Obits for the 77-year-old Larson, centered on how he created shows such as Knight Rider, Battlestar Galactica and The Fall Guy. But he also dabbled in the spy genre.

One of Larson’s first major credits was first as associate producer, then producer of It Takes a Thief, the 1968-70 spy series starring Robert Wagner. Thief was one of the last entries in the 1960s spy craze on U.S. television. Wagner played a thief employed by a U.S. intelligence agency to steal secrets from enemies of the U.S. government. Larson ended up writing 17 of the 66 episodes, according to HIS IMDB.COM ENTRY.

In 1983, Larson created another spy series, the short-lived Masquerade, which ran only 13 episodes on ABC. The show concerned U.S. spymaster Lavender (Rod Taylor) and was a cross between The Man From U.N.C.L.E. and Mission: Impossible.

In Masquerade, the KGB knows U.S. spies all too well, so Lavender recruits teams of “innocents” (a major U.N.C.L.E. element) promising them a year’s salary of their day jobs, to assist intelligence operations. Each episode included a briefing sequence, where Lavender gave the audience only a glimpse of what was to happen (similar to M:I). Larson even employed William Read Woodfield, one of the major M:I writers, to work on Masquerade.

The Fall Guy, which also aired on ABC from 1981 to 1986, featured Lee Majors as stuntman Colt Seavers, a Hollywood stuntman who moonlighted as a bounty hunter to make ends meet.

The second-season premier, Bail and Bond, has Colt working as a stuntman on a James Bond-like movie filming in Brazil. It includes some music that sounds as close as you can get to The James Bond Theme without paying royalties.

At one point, Colt “borrows” some wardrobe from the movie to do a bounty hunting job. His sidekick (Douglas Barr) remarks, “That last scene with Roger won’t exactly come off if he has to play it in his underwear.” Presumably, that’s a veiled reference to Roger Moore, the incumbent film Bond at the time time.

If that wasn’t enough, the guest stars for the episode included Martine Beswicke, who played secondary female roles in From Russia With Love and Thunderball, and character Sid Haig, who was a gangster in Diamonds Are Forever (“I got a bruddah!”)

Here’s a version of Bail and Bond on YouTube. Warning: it’s “time compressed” (meaning it’s been sped up to reduce the running time).

U.N.C.L.E. double feature in LA on Nov. 21-22

UNCLE DOUBLE FEATURE

Theatrical showings of two movies re-edited from The Man From U.N.C.L.E. are scheduled for Los Angeles on Nov. 21 and 22.

The Spy With My Face and One Spy Too Many are to be shown at the New Beverly Cinema, a revival movie house owned by director Quentin Tarantino. Each movie will be shown once on Friday, Nov. 21 and twice on Saturday, Nov. 22. The latter date also marks the 82nd birthday of Robert Vaughn, who played Napoleon Solo in the 1964-68 series.

For specific times and a link to buy tickets, you can CLICK HERE.

Each film contains scenes not in the television versions of their stories. For more information about The Spy With My Face, CLICK HERE and scroll down to episode 8. For more information about One Spy Too Many, CLICK HERE and read about episodes 30-31 at the top of the page.

The theater also plans another double feature of note for spy fans.

On Nov. 23 and 24, it will show The Venetian Affair, a serious 1967 spy movie also starring Robert Vaughn, with a cast that includes Luciana Paluzzi and Boris Karloff, and Hickey & Boggs, a 1972 movie reuniting Robert Culp and Bill Cosby as private eyes.Hickey & Boggs was directed by Culp and written by Walter Hill. Culp and Cosby had starred in I Spy, the 1965-68 espionage series.

Intrusion of real life paragraph:

Cosby has been in the news the past week because of rape allegations going back several years that he has denied (this CNN story summarizes the situation) and also because of his philanthropy (loaning 60 pieces of African art to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African Art as detailed in this NPR story).

Wo Fat: classic vs. reboot (spoiler)

Hawaii-five-O-original

Stop reading if spoilers give you anguish. (Although the episode has been out since Nov. 7.)

So, Wo Fat 2.0 met his demise in the 100th episode of the rebooted Hawaii Five-0.

Executive producer Peter Lenkov TOLD TV GUIDE:

When I wrote the outline [for the episode], he wasn’t dead in the outline. And when I started writing the script, it really felt like a natural end to the episode. I had always envisioned following the pattern of the original show, with the last show that we ever do being the capture of Wo Fat. But I felt, when I was writing it, that that felt a little predictable for people who watch the show and know the original one…I felt like if I was going to surprise the audience at any point, this would be it.

In the rebooted show, which debuted in the fall of 2010, Wo Fat 2.0 (Mark Dacascos) was used a lot more than the original Wo Fat (Khigh Dhiegh). Rebooted Wo Fat appeared in 15 episodes in less than five full seasons. By comparison, original Wo Fat appeared 13 times in 12 full seasons of Hawaii Five-O (which was how the original show was spelled). This counts his appearance in the pilot as only one appearance (even though the pilot was later re-edited as a two-part episode). We’re counting all other two-part episodes as one appearance for for each part. The original Wo Fat didn’t appear at all in seasons 6, 10 and 11.

Rebooted Wo Fat was supposed to be mastermind *and* terrific fighter. Thus, he was lean, mean and a master of martial arts. Portly original Wo Fat was content to be a mastermind who let others do the violence and generally manipulated events. It should be noted that Wo Fat 2.0 had virtual control of Hawaii (at the end of season 1 it was revealed the governor was under his control) but nobody knew it.

Damon back as Bourne: JB vs. JB

bourne poster

Matt Damon TOLD E! ONLINE that he’s returning to the role of Jason Bourne with Paul Greenglass again directing.

The movie would be made next year for a 2016 release, according to the E! Online interview. Does that mean we’ll once again get some James Bond “trash talk”?

Damon made three Bourne movies from 2002 to 2007: The Bourne Identity, The Bourne Supremacy and The Bourne Ultimatum. The latter two were directed by Greenglass.

In the 2000s, Damon wasn’t shy about criticizing Bond. For example, there’s this 2009 quote from a Miami Herald interview via The Huffington Post.

Damon called Bond an “imperalist, misogynist who goes around swilling martinis and bedding women and killing people. He’s repulsive.” He made almost identical comments in 2007 (also using the “imperalist” and “misogynist” gibes), ACCORDING TO THE DAILY MAIL.

At one time, Bourne was very much on the minds of the makers of James Bond movies. THE NEW YORK TIMES in October 2005 quoted executives it didn’t identify that “the model” for recasting the 007 role with Daniel Craig was the Bourne films.

The resemblance between the Bourne movies and Bond came with Craig’s second 007 film, Quantum of Solace. The movie utilized the services of Dan Bradley as second unit director, the same job he held on the Bourne movies. It had a lot of rapid camera movement, particularly in the first 20 minutes, similar to the Bourne series.

Since then, with 2012′s Sam Mendes-directed Skyfall, the Bourne-isms faded. Greenglass interviewed Mendes about Skyfall in 2012.

Bond 24, again with Mendes at the helm, is scheduled for a fall 2015 release. So it will be out well before Damon’s next Bourne effort. Still, given that Damon is an outspoken actor, it’ll be interesting to see if we hear more from Damon on the JB vs. JB comparison.

The U.N.C.L.E. movie: Easter eggs? What Easter eggs?

Henry Cavill and Armie Hammer (Art by Paul Baack)

Henry Cavill and Armie Hammer
(Art by Paul Baack)

We have no idea how The Man From U.N.C.L.E. movie will turn out. But we know this much: Don’t expect a movie version of the original 1964-68 television series.

Movie makers want to put their own spin on things. It happened with the 1999 Wild Wild West movie. It happened with the 1993 The Fugitive movie. It happens with the Mission: Impossible movies that began in 1996 (which made Jim Phelps a villain before killing him off) and whose fifth installment is in production.

The U.N.C.L.E. movie has thrown a few bones out. Or, to use a popular term, “Easter eggs” — little items for hard-core fans. The name of the film’s villain is the same as a villain in the television series. But that’s superficial. They’re different characters. The clapperboards of the movie used the same font as the main titles of the television show. But, when push comes to shove, Warner Bros. during test screenings of the movie, made sure than older fans wouldn’t be admitted to those showings.

At this point, there’s no way to know whether the Jerry Goldsmith theme music for the series will even be used in Daniel Pemberton’s score. Then again, Wild Wild West in 1999 included Richard Markowitz’s theme from the 1965-69 television series (though not in the film’s main titles). That didn’t make the movie — which many fans thought too goofy — any more like the show.

All of this doesn’t mean the movie, due for release in August 2015, won’t be good. It may be. But there’s enough circumstantial evidence to suggest it will be a completely different take than that of executive producer Norman Felton and developer-producer Sam Rolfe as well as stars Robert Vaughn and David McCallum. Henry Cavill, who plays Napoleon Solo, the role that Vaughn made famous, has already said he never saw an episode.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 145 other followers