Oscar update III: John Barry leads off “In Memoriam”

John Barry, the 11-time 007 composer who established the musical sound of James Bond movies (and won five Oscars for four non-Bond movies), was the first person included in the “In Memoriam” segment of the Oscars telecast. But there were a number of others included that contributed to 007 and other spy related entertainment.

They included: Alan Hume, director of photography on three Bond movies in the 1980s; Irvin Kershner, director of the 1983 Bond film Never Say Never Again, who is probably best known for directing 1980’s The Empire Strikes Back; Tom Mankiewicz, credited as a screenwriter on three 1970s 007 films and an uncredited writer on two others.

Also included were Robert Culp, the star of television’s I Spy; Anne Francis, the star of television’s Honey West; and Leslie Nielsen, who made a late-career switch to comedy that included a 007 parody, Spy Hard. All three did extensive film work in movies and television.

2 Responses

  1. It was nice to see the tribute given to John Barry and all the others.
    However, you really should list Kershner as a director of an ‘unofficial’ Bond film, as this is the way it is ‘officially’ listed in the entertainment industry (unles you also want to count both the TV and 1967 CASINO ROYALE as ‘official’, as well).
    A minor point, but it is nice to see the facts properly displayed.

  2. …you really should list Kershner as a director of an ‘unofficial’ Bond film, as this is the way it is ‘officially’ listed in the entertainment industry (unles you also want to count both the TV and 1967 CASINO ROYALE as ‘official’, as well).
    A minor point, but it is nice to see the facts properly displayed.

    Pity there are no facts in your post with which you could illustrate this proper display. Where is this “official” entertainment industry listing and on what basis does it determine which films are “official” and which are not?

    “Produced by EON Productions” is NOT the definition of “official.” Neither is “part of EON’s film series.” The producers of all three versions of Casino Royale and of both versions of Thunderball had the legal rights, at the time they made their films, to produce films featuring James Bond and other characters created by Ian Fleming. I have no fondness for either the TV or the 1967 feature of Casino Royale and I think Never Say Never Again is at best a mediocre Bond film, but I also think at least half a dozen of the films in the EON series are fairly unmitigated crap. But in what sense were any of them either “official” or “unofficial?” The words are meaningless in that context.

    The “entertainment industry” for which you feel empowered to speak is not Major League Baseball, with an “official’ set of records. Your “facts” are balloon-thin opinions inflated with Truthiness. There are no actual facts to display.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: