Dissecting the SPECTRE teaser trailer

SPECTRE teaser poster

SPECTRE teaser poster

By Nicolás Suszczyk, Guest Writer

This post originally appeared in Portuguese on the Pipoca Gigante website. People who consider trailers as spoilers should not read.

The arrival of the teaser trailer is one of the most awaited moments for James Bond fans every time a new film is produced. It’s the first actual glimpse of the upcoming film and it gives you an idea of what awaits.

On the evening of Friday, March 27, the countdown on the official James Bond site reached zero and fans from around the world got the first look at SPECTRE, set for a November release.

The tradition of the 007 teaser trailers has changed as much as the movie plots. Back in the 1960s and 1970s we had the high-sounding coming attractions shouting JAMES BOND IS BACK, showcasing much of the action sequences of the film and the name of the star, SEAN CONNERY or ROGER MOORE in big and bold capital letters, as well as many of the members of the cast being mentioned.

This tradition slowed down by the times of Pierce Brosnan, whose James Bond era started with GoldenEye in 1995. Teaser trailers were less extravagant, yet they focused in the action scenes, the witty lines and –- in a more discrete way –- the name of the actor playing Bond either had a credit or was mentioned in the narrations.

One of the key elements of the Brosnan era teaser trailers were the narrations: “Some men want to rule the world, but for one man… The World is not Enough,” claimed the trailer for the 1999 blockbuster directed by Michael Apted.

As Daniel Craig took over the role in 2006 with Casino Royale, a grittier approach was taken with shots of the film’s action sequences or Bond’s emotional reactions. 2012’s Skyfall gave little away about the film’s plot and its highlight was 007’s admission test with a therapist who provokes a stone-faced reaction of the spy when he mentions the film’s title during a word-association exercise. That, of course, led to the usual flashes of action sequences.

SPECTRE is particularly interesting because the teaser trailer breaks a tradition. There are no action scenes at all.

The focus is on the mysterious past of James Bond and a few ties with the Skyfall case: personal effects on found on the ruins of 007’s childhood residence show he had a secret. “something you can’t tell anyone, because you don’t trust anyone”, in the words of Naomie Harris’ Miss Moneypenny.

We can see 007 exploring some papers including an authorization of guardianship when he was 12 (dated January 21, 1983 – so we assume Bond was born in 1971) and a photo of him in a snowy place with an elderly man and another older stepbrother whose face isn’t clearly seen since the photo survived the lodge’s explosions.

We’re meant to believe this is also related to the film’s villain, Oberhauser, played by Cristoph Waltz. In the short story Octopussy, Ian Fleming specifies a man called Hannes Oberhauser taught James Bond to ski during his teens and as a matter of fact the secret agent is sent to settle the score with the man who apparently shot him, one Major Dexter Smythe (this is also briefly mentioned and modified in the 1983 film with the same name).

As many Bond enthusiasts know, screenwriters Neal Purvis and Robert Wade have always borrowed Fleming materials since they started working on the series in The World is not Enough, so it won’t be strange something of this material would make an appearance in SPECTRE.

The following shots, besides highlighting Hoyte van Hoytema’s cinematography, contain quite a few references to the previous Bond films.

As 007 enters an abandoned cabin two crows quickly fly next to him, a quick reminder of director John Glen’s trademark every time a dove disturbed Bond when climbing a building or a mountain (see For your eyes only and Licence to Kill). Then the spy meets an old enemy, Mr. White, the character Jesper Christensen played in two previous Daniel Craig films, Casino Royale and his follow-up Quantum of Solace.

The man, leader of the Quantum criminal organization and responsible of the suicide of Bond’s short-time girlfriend Vesper Lynd (Eva Green), is seen in the misery: beardy, tired and ragged. He’s playing chess, apparently alone, which could be considered as a reference to 1963’s From Russia with Love where SPECTRE agent Kronsteen (Vladek Sheybal) is a chess master and uses his intellect to plan Bond’s assassination.

“You’re a kite dancing on a hurricane, Mr. Bond”, says White as 007 shows him a more discreet version of the classic octopus ring that identified the organization the film is named after.

We understand, as many sources pointed out, that this movie would tie the stories and sub-plots started in the three previous films, such as Vesper’s death (Casino Royale), the Quantum organization (Quantum of Solace) and the passing of Judi Dench’s M (Skyfall).

The very last minutes of the teaser trailer are a clear reference to the SPECTRE meeting in Thunderball (1965), where Ernst Stavro Blofeld leads a meeting of his operatives in Paris. The image of Oberhauser, with his face hidden in the shadows, echoes the days where Blofeld’s face wasn’t seen leaving the audiences only with a shot of his hands stroking the white cat.

“Welcome, James. It’s been a long time. But finally, here we are,” Oberhauser says during an Illuminati-esque board meeting of the organization that Bond seems to infiltrate after –- or before -– attending a funeral where Monica Bellucci’s character Lucia Sciarra is seen. Curiously enough, in Thunderball Blofeld mentioned to his agents the death of another SPECTRE member, Colonel Jacques Boitier. Would be that a SPECTRE funeral, maybe?

As the countdown to the film’s release starts, producer Michael G. Wilson told reporters he aimed to construct this teaser trailer as “a puzzle”. Without doubt, he accomplished this effect with great success.

Nicolás Suszczyk is editor of The GoldenEye Dossier.

Here’s the trailer if you haven’t seen it:

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