SPECTRE song debuts; BBC describes reaction as mixed

SPECTRE LOGO

Sam Smith’s “Writing’s On the Wall,” the title song for SPECTRE, is out today and, ACCORDING TO THE BBC, “split opinion.”

The song for the 24th James Bond film was made available early today at outlets such as ITUNES (where it was priced at $1.29) and SPOTIFY.

One of the song’s most prominent backers was Roger Moore, star of seven 007 films, who said IN A TWEET that “Writing’s On the Wall” is “very haunting and wonderfully orchestrated.”:

The BBC also quoted others, including its own entertainment reporter, on the subject. Here’s an excerpt:

BBC entertainment correspondent Colin Paterson said it was “good enough, but not a classic”.

The song, whose full version runs for 4 minutes and 38 seconds, begins with the words: “I’ve been here before / But always hit the floor.”

“I’ve spent a lifetime running, and I always get away,” it continues. “But with you I’m feeling something, that makes we want to stay.”

“I think it’s a song about a man deciding to quit it all for love,” Paterson said of the track on BBC Breakfast, comparing its melody to that of Michael Jackson’s 1995 single Earth Song.

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3 Responses

  1. Agreed. Terribly whiny song!!!! Ouch!

    Better luck next time slug heads! 😊 Sent from my iPhone

    >

  2. Not the enthusiastic response Sony was certainly waiting for , then …

  3. I disagree. Music is subjective and many people enjoyed Another Way to Die but I personally hate it. A View to a Kill took me a long time to finally enjoy it and Madonna’s Die Another Day is not even worth mentioning beyond these words. Yet, Writing’s On the Wall works very well. It is a love ballad sung from OO7’s point of view and a theme that has been part of the Craig era since Vesper committed suicide. The words “If I risk it all, could you break my fall foreshadows what we have been told since the beginning of production, that Bond is about to go over-the-top to discover the awful truth of his destiny. The song may not be Goldfinger or Live and Let Die, but it fits into the Sam Mendes era similar to Adele’s Skyfall. On a scale from 1 to 10 I give WOTW an 8.

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