The New Yorker picks at a No Time to Die Scab

New No Time to Die poster

The New Yorker magazine for decades has made penetrating comments about politics and the arts. In a May 1 article, writer Anthony Lane picks at a scab involving No Time to Die.

One of the first signs that covid-19 would play havoc with our moviegoing habits came with the news that 007 was running scared. The world première of the new James Bond film, bearing the deeply unfortunate title “No Time to Die,” was meant to take place at the Royal Albert Hall, in London, on March 31st. Oh, to be in England, now that Bond was there!

Harsh words? No. Lane was just getting started.

One of the first signs that covid-19 would play havoc with our moviegoing habits came with the news that 007 was running scared. The world première of the new James Bond film, bearing the deeply unfortunate title “No Time to Die,” was meant to take place at the Royal Albert Hall, in London, on March 31st. Oh, to be in England, now that Bond was there!

There’s more, of course. But there’s only so much cynicism to go around. If you want to read the entire article, you can CLICK HERE.

In the big picture, COVID-19 (the preferred AP Stylebook way to refer to the novel coronavirus) has shut down life as we once we knew it for the past few months. Movie theaters have been shut down. They’re not exactly sure how to revive operations. And many in the general populace aren’t sure when they actually want to see a movie in a theater for a long time to come.

No Time to Die is one way for a New Yorker scribe to make a bigger point. Yet, for Bond fans desperate to see a Bond film — ANY Bond film — after a five-year absence, they’re not really wanting to engage in subtle debate.

The New Yorker didn’t. Here’s one more passage.

The chance to revel gaily in the latest Bond production, and then to lament that it wasn’t as good as the last one, or the one before that, or the one with the Japanese volcano, comes along every four or five years, and is connected to the great circle of life. Without 007, how shall we endure the spring?

Of course, a volcano hideout was used in exactly one Bond film, 1967’s You Only Live Twice. But hey, if you’re a Very Important Writer, it’s a trope. It’s a trope people remember. It may not be subtle, but who cares?

In real life, there are not many James Bond things actually happening. So it’s good if The New Yorker actually remembers. Right?

Maybe. For now, it’s like a big-time publication picking off a scab. for effect