THR features Lynch, de Armas and evolving Bond women

Lashana Lynch publicity still released during April “reveal” event in Jamaica

The Hollywood Reporter is out with a feature story about Lashana Lynch and Ana de Armas and how they’re part of efforts “about bringing James Bond into the #MeToo age” in No Time to Die.

Lynch and de Armas have worked with director Cary Fukunaga and producer Barbara Broccoli “to create a new type of female Bond character who is much more fully realized than the ‘Bond girls’ of films past,” writes Rebecca Ford of THR.

“It’s pretty obvious that there is an evolution in the fact that Lashana is one of the main characters in the film and wears the pants — literally,” de Armas told the entertainment news outlet.

Referring to her character, Nomi, Lynch told THR: “Everyone was really responsive to having her be what I wanted. You’re given a fresh perspective on a brand-new black woman in the Bond world.”

Lynch confirmed Nomi is a British agent. She did not comment whether that character has the 007 code number after Bond departed MI6. Ford wrote that “sources close to the film tell THR that it’s accurate.”

The Lynch character joins a series of women agents in the Bond film series, including Soviet Agent Triple-X in The Spy Who Loved Me; CIA agent and astronaut Holly Goodhead in Moonraker; Chinese operative Wai Lin in Tomorrow Never Dies; and NSA agent Jinx in Die Another Day.

De Armas, meanwhile, provided a bit of detail about her character, Paloma.

Paloma “is a character that is very irresponsible,” the actress told THR. “She’s got this bubbliness of someone who is excited to be on a mission, but she plays with this ambiguity — you don’t really know if she’s like a really trained, prepared partner for Bond.”

This is not the first time the franchise has said it’s improving the way women are treated in Bond films. In 2012, Broccoli told the Evening Standard: “Fortunately, the days of Bond girls standing around with a clipboard are over.”

However, No Time to Die is the first Bond film since the #MeToo movement against sexual assault and sexual harassment.

In 2018, The New York Times and The New Yorker magazine shared a Pulitizer Prize “for their revelations of sexual harassment and abuse that had gone on, unheeded and unpunished, in the spheres of Hollywood, politics, the media and Silicon Valley,” The Times said in its account of the awards.

Other highlights from the article:

–THR says the movie’s budget is $250 million. This is the first estimate I’ve seen. That is probably after tax breaks, incentives and product placement deals have been factored in.

–Both actresses compliment screenwriter Phoebe Waller-Bridge. “I very literally squealed when I first heard her name,” Lynch said to THR. “I thought, ‘Oh my gosh, British girl just like me. She’s going to know how to actually take care of women onscreen.’ ”

–De Armas told THR that reports that an “intimacy coach” being hired for her scenes with Daniel Craig were false.

To view the entire article, CLICK HERE.

Bond 25 questions: The composer edition (again? maybe?)

No Time to Die teaser poster

On All Saints’ Day 2019, the James Bond Radio podcast raised the question whether Dan Romer may not score No Time to Die after all.

On posts on Twitter and Facebook, the fan site said it heard from a source that Romer has left the 25th James Bond film. Romer has worked with No Time to Die director Cary Fukunaga on other projects.

At this point, there’s no way to know. In the James Bond Radio post on Facebook, there was this caveat: “Our source does seem credible, but of course you never know for sure until we get an official word.”

With all that in mind, the blog has some questions:

Is Romer really gone?

There’s no way to know. Eon Productions isn’t likely to say until a replacement is lined up.

Is this sort of thing unusual?

Not really. Bernard Herrmann scored a number of films for producer-director Alfred Hitchcock. But Herrmnn delivered a score for Torn Curtain (1966). Hitchcock hated it and that was the end of the long collaboration between director and composer.

More recently, Warner Bros. superhero film Justice League (2017) started out with a score by Junkie XL. But the powers that be rejected it and Danny Elfman came in Elfman included his own theme for the 1989 Batman movie as well as John Williams’ theme for the 1978 Superman movie.

If (repeat IF) Romer is gone, who might replace him?

A lot of Bond fans would love to have five-time Bond film composer David Arnold back. Arnold hasn’t scored a Bond film since 2008’s Quantum of Solace.

Arnold has a following among Bond fans, many of whom have been wishing he’d return. Director Sam Mendes insisted on Thomas Newman to compose the scores for Skyfall and SPECTRE. Then, Romer was the man for No Time to Die, presumably because he worked with Fukunaga before.

Another fan favorite is composer Michael Giacchino, who has worked in John Barry-style flourishes in a number of scores including The Incredibles (2004) and other films. His credits include one Mission: Impossible movie and a number of Marvel Studios films.

Any other thoughts?

Not really. The James Bond Radio social media posts quickly spread among fans. It remains to be seen what’s really happening. That’s not a criticism of James Bond Radio. We just don’t know what’s happening.

Bond 25 questions: The Empire magazine edition

No Time to Die teaser poster

A (short) Empire magazine article is due out on Oct. 31. Naturally, the blog has a few questions.

Will this movie be different from other Daniel Craig Bond films?

Perhaps not.

The Empire article has this quote from Barbara Broccoli, the boss of Eon Productions:

“We always like to have a very personal trial for him emotionally, put him up against something that he finds difficult to deal with emotionally.”

So, if this quote is accurate, No Time to Die will have the same tone that began with 2006’s Casino Royale and which extended into 2015’s SPECTRE.

No differences at all?

Not necessarily. Director Cary Fukunaga may come up with visual differences. Screenwriter Phoebe Waller-Bridge may contribute some bits. Already, Daily Mail scribe Baz Bamigboye has floated a story saying Waller-Bridge’s contributions to the script have saved the movie.

At this point, Waller-Bridge saving the movie is about to become a talking point in the marketing.  We will also hear about how Daniel Craig is the best and/or favorite James Bond performer.

Any conclusions?

If you love Daniel Craig versions of James Bond films, you’ll love this one. If you’re indifferent to Daniel Craig versions of James Bond films, you’ll probably be indifferent to this one. If you hate Daniel Craig versions of James Bond films, you’ll hate this one (most likely).

Really?

It’s possible director Cary Fukunaga comes up with some visual/style changes. There may be surprises audiences can’t anticipate.

We’ll see.

Bond 25 questions: The end of filming edition

No Time to Die logo

No Time to Die wrapped up principal photography this week. Naturally, the blog has some questions.

Does it seem like there’s been less publicity than other Bond movies?

Compared to the films earlier this decades, yes.

Skyfall and SPECTRE each had a series of video blogs. A crew member would describe his or her responsibilities, for example. One of the SPECTRE vlogs showed preparations for a car chase. Another highlighted the preparations for a big explosion.

Also, with SPECTRE, some news outlets were given access to do stories about the car chase. The Associated Press posted a short video. The Mail on Sunday ran a story with behind-the-scenes details about the chase sequence.

Not so much with No Time to Die.

There was a single promotional video in June showing filming in Jamaica. A visit by Prince Charles in June to the set generated a lot of TV images. In one video, star Daniel Craig can be seen explaining how the Aston Martin DB5s in the film are replicas, with carbon fiber bodies and BMW engines.

On the other hand, cast and crew members (particularly director Cary Fukunaga) made social media posts. And when the crew went to Matera, Italy, tourists took many smartphone videos that spread quickly.

When will things change?

No Time to Die added to its publicity efforts on Saturday when Empire posted a story with an image from the movie.

The entertainment publication said the image is part of its 2020 Preview issue out next week.

What’s next?

There still isn’t a trailer. The James Bond & Friends podcast said months ago there was a rough cut of a teaser trailer. For whatever reason, that has stayed under wraps. No word on when it will come out.

Based on Empire’s story, there may be articles by other outlets that have been prepared but are embargoed until closer to the movie’s April release.

No Time to Dies finishes filming; off to post-production

No Time to Die teaser poster

No Time to Die, the 25th James Bond film made by Eon Productions, officially finished filming on Friday, Oct. 25.

The official Eon Productions 007 Twitter feed published a post announcing the end of filming. The tweet included a photo of star Daniel Craig and director Cary Fukunaga.

The Bond production now officially moves to post-production. The post-production crew now must ready the film to meet an early April 2020 release date.

Publicity for the movie, so far, has been sparse. The title was announced in August. But a trailer has yet to be released. It’s not known for sure when a first trailer will come out.

Here’s the tweet from Eon:

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

No Time to Die wraps filming (evidently)

No Time to Die logo

No Time to Die has apparently completed (or is about to complete) filming. At least it is done enough that crew members are taking to social media to say their goodbyes. (CLICK HERE and CLICK HERE for examples.) Even if those posts are a bit premature, this stage of the saga is ending.

To say the journey has had its ups and downs is an understatement. An ankle injury to its star, Daniel Craig. An explosion in June that damaged the exterior of the 007 Stage at Pinewood Studios. More than one tabloid headline referring to a doomed production.

Meanwhile, a team of writers, including Bond newcomers Phoebe Waller-Bridge and Scott Z. Burns, wrestled with the story. A new director to the series, Cary Fukunaga, is following in the footsteps of Terence Young and other directors for the Eon series.

There is, of course, a lot that fans are curious about. What’s the name of the villain played by Rami Malek? To date, there have been no stills of the actor in character. What about a trailer? Who knows at this point. What will new composer Dan Romer bring to the party?

Still, there have been some of the usual moments in the lead up to a new Bond film. A Bond actress proclaiming her character is different than all those other Bond women? Ana de Armas just came through in a feature story.

Next up: Putting the movie together in time for an April 2020 release. By now, Bond films are well known for tight post-production schedules. There will likely be some late nights in the editing bays ahead — if they haven’t started already.

UPDATE (5:40 p.m., New York time): The MI6 James Bond website says filming is scheduled to be actually completed on Friday, Oct. 25. See the tweet below.

 

Bond 25 questions: James Bond Day edition

No Time to Die teaser poster

Another James Bond Day appears to be in the books. But the blog still has some questions about the meaning of the day’s events.

What’s this holiday’s name again?

In 2012, Global James Bond Day debuted. It was the 50th anniversary of when Dr. No had its U.K. debut. The new “holiday” was a marketing move to note the Bond film franchise’s 50th anniversary.

Since then, it’s had the name Global James Bond Day. Until this year.

Eon Productions (via a tweet) as well as Pinewood Studios (also in a tweet), Orlebar Brown (a maker of pricey 007-themed clothing, also in a tweet) and Aston Martin (you guessed it, in a tweet) all called it James Bond Day, with the “Global” taken off.

However, No Time to Die director Cary Fukunaga, in a video on his Instagram page, called it “International James Bond Day.”

The memo didn’t make it to many Bond fan sites that kept referring to it as Global James Bond Day.

What about the teaser poster?

It came out on (Global/International) James Bond Day. But it was a minimalist affair, with an image of Daniel Craig in a tuxedo.

What about the teaser trailer?

That’s an event for another day, apparently. We’re about six months from the debut of No Time to Die. So you’d think it’d be out sooner than later. But not on (Global/International) James Bond Day.

Who was responsible for the teaser poster?

Some fans on social media were inclined to blame studios (either MGM, Bond’s home studio or its distribution partners).

However, in 2015, Eon’s Michael Wilson said Eon does the marketing and studios just execute what Eon devises. If he was correct, Eon has some fingerprints on that poster.

What about those Bond-themed names for new roads at Pinewood Studios?

Pinewood said an expansion area will have a Michael G. Wilson Road and Skyfall Avenue. The announcement came as the future of Bond at Pinewood is up in the air.

Pinewood Group PLC, Pinewood’s owner, and Walt Disney Co. have announced a deal where Disney will lock up the vast bulk of Pinewood facilities in a long-term deal. Shepperton Studios, also owned by Pinewood Group, this summer reached a deal with Netflix that locks up most of that studio space.

It remains to be seen how this will play out. But it raises the possibility that Disney crews will travel on Michael G. Wilson Road and Skyfall Avenue so they can perform their day’s work. Not to mention going to the Albert R. Broccoli 007 Stage to do a day’s labor.