A sampling of mirth and merriment with 007 on Google

Image for the official James Bond feed on Twitter

Image for the official James Bond feed on Twitter

One of the habits this blog has is typing “news about James Bond” into Google to make sure we haven’t missed anything. Of late, there’s nothing to *really miss* but that doesn’t stop stories from being cranked out.

On Friday afternoon, for example, there are a number of stories about a number of actors who don’t know very much about the future of the 007 franchise. Here’s a sampling of the mirth and merriment. We don’t actually encourage to click on the links but for those who can’t help themselves, you can check these items out further.

Naomie Harris in the dark about James Bond (XPOSE.ie): The actress, who played Moneypenny in Skyfall and SPECTRE, doesn’t know if Daniel Craig is going to return to the 007 role or not. Turns out the story is actually a summary of The Evening Standard. But it rocketed to the top of our Google search anyway.

Damian Lewis has heard nothing about James Bond role (Guelph Mercury Tribune): The actor, 44, “had no contact with anyone about the possibility of him taking on the role of James Bond.” Once upon a time, that would have meant no story. Oh well…

Has Tom Hiddleston ruled himself out of playing James Bond (Metro): Of course, you’d think someone would actually have to make you an offer first, or even inquired about your availability. Metro’s story is a summary of a talk show appearance but declares Hiddleston has “practically ruled himself out.” Metro calls this, “Tragic.”

Ewan McGregor doesn’t understand why an actor would want to play James Bond (Metro again): The headline pretty says it all.

There were  7.42 million items in all in the search.

 

A weird week (at least on the Internet) for SPECTRE

SPECTRE LOGO

This was an unusual week for SPECTRE. The marketing effort for the 24th James Bond film zigged one way but the Internet zagged in an entirely different direction.

The week began with a video blog showing behind-the-scenes footage during SPECTRE’s shoot in Mexico City back in March.

That’s understandable. The Mexico City sequence opens the film (the filmmakers have disclosed this, so it’s not a spoiler). It’s going to be expansive, so the short video sought to give the viewer an idea of that without giving any plot details away.

The Internet, however, refused to be gently guided in that direction. Bookmaker William Hill in the U.K. decided to alter its odds for the actor succeeds Daniel Craig as Bond. Craig said back in 2012 he was contracted for two films. That would mean he’s on board through Bond 25. That would indicate, there won’t be an actual vacancy until 2018 or so.

Nevertheless, the bookmaker moved actor Damian Lewis to 3-1, generating stories in familiar trade publications such as THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER and VARIETY as well as outlets such as THE TELEGRAPH and ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY. Even The Atlantic, which normally analyzes weighty and serious matters, DID A STORY that used the William Hill news as a news peg to also examine whether the next 007 should be black.

Referring to SPECTRE star Daniel Craig and his blonde hair and Lewis and his red hair, The Atlantic story concluded, “Ten years removed from his casting, the fuss about Craig seems ridiculous, and it’s hard to imagine a public outcry if Lewis really did sign on to the franchise. “But the same can’t be said for what could happen if the producers defied change-averse Brits to make a truly bold casting decision.”

In any case, Indiewire took the whole thing a step further. It asked readers to PARTICIPATE IN A SURVEY about who should be Craig’s successor. (Indiewire calls it a poll, but it’s not. An actual poll employs statistical methods in selecting its sample of respondents. This is just click on whoever you want to be 007.) Anyway, there were turn out the vote efforts by fans of potential future Bonds.

It’s probably safe to assume the folks at Eon Productions and their studio partners at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and Sony Pictures are not real happy about this turn of events.

MGM and Sony are ponying up $300 million or more and, no doubt, would rather have the public concentrate on the upcoming SPECTRE due out in November than the next re-casting of Bond, whenever that occurs. In the 21st Century, the Internet sometimes has a way of not cooperating with movie marketing.