007 Magazine features Robert Sellers on ‘Search for Bond’

Sean Connery in a 007 publicity still

Sean Connery in a 007 publicity still

The website for Graham Rye’s 007 Magazine has a new article by Robert Sellers titled “The Search for Bond.”

The website bills the article as the “exclusive never-before-told story behind the actors who won, and the many who lost, the most coveted role in cinema history!”

Sellers previous wrote the book The Battle for Bond, a book about the history of Thunderball.

A free preview on the website includes information on how Ian Fleming met in 1959 with screenwriter Paul Dehn (who’d eventually craft the later drafts of Goldfinger) to discuss translating Fleming’s novels to the screen.

The duo discussed how a “pre-Cleopatra/pre-Elizabeth Richard Burton would be an ideal James Bond, according to the preview. Of course, the role of Bond at this point was far from a coveted role.

Parts one and two of three parts are on a pay-to-view portion of the website. CLICK HERE for more information. The yearly subscription is 9.99 British pounds ($12.90) and a monthly subscription 4.99 British pounds ($6.44).

1964: John Le Carre appears on To Tell the Truth

David Cornell, aka John Le Carre

David Cornwell, aka John Le Carre

There was a time that game shows sometimes featured major literary or even historical figures. So it was in 1964 on the Mark Goodson-Bill Todman program To Tell The Truth when author David Cornwell, aka John Le Carre, was a contestant.

At the time of the broadcast on CBS, the author’s The Spy Who Came in From the Cold was a best seller. Cornwell had sold the film rights and it would be made into A 1965 MOVIE STARRING RICHARD BURTON. One of the screenwriters would be Paul Dehn, who had penned the later drafts of 1964’s Goldfinger.

The regular panel of Tom Poston, Peggy Cass, Orson Bean and Kitty Carlisle faced the daunting task of determining which of three contestents had once worked in British intelligence. The outcome? Well, let’s just say it didn’t turn out well for the panel.

Here’s the broadcast, featuring host Bud Collyer. Our usual caveat: these things are often yanked off YouTube, so it’s possible the embedded video may be gone by the time you see see this. Cornwell/Le Carre appears in the second of the three games:

Two minor observations about Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy

We caught up with the new movie version of Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy. It’s well worth your time. But, in our own fashion, we wanted to make a couple of tangent observations about the adaptation of the John Le Carre novel. Minor spoilers follow.

1. Anti-Bond George Smiley meets 007 knock off Charles Vine (sort of). In the 1960s, the success of James Bond films helped create a demand for an “anti Bond,” somebody who wasn’t a romantic hero and who dealt in a morally ambiguous world, just like real spies. The novels of John Le Carre (real name David Cornwell) provided the perfect fodder. The Spy Who Came In From the Cold starring Richard Burton came out in 1965, with George Smiley a secondary character, Bernard Lee (the M of Eon Productions’s 007 series) in the cast and Paul Dehn, co-screenwriter of Goldfinger, part of the crew.

The ’60s Bond films also generated 007 takeoffs, including The Second Best Secret Agent in The Whole Wide World, starring Tom Adams as Charles Vine, a Sean Connery-esque, British agent.

Well, in the new Tinker, Tailor, these two trends from the past are merged. The 2011 film has repeated flashbacks to an MI6 Christmas party. At one point, the theme song to Second Best Secret Agent is played. (Le Carre has a cameo, as well.) This is part of an effort by the filmmakers to tie into cultural references of the past, given that Tinker, Tailor is done as a 1970s period piece. Which leads us to:

2. The temptation to overdo past cultural references. This is a minor quibble. But when movies are done as period pieces — especially of a story that has been made before (Tinker, Tailor was made as a television miniseries more than 30 years ago) — there is a temptation to load up on past cultural references. In this case, hairstyles and music. In the new film, Peter Guillam (Benedict Cumberbatch) sports a haircut more appropriate for ’70s high school students rather than an experienced MI6 operative. And the film sometimes overdoes it with providing ’70s songs.

It’s always interesting to compare remakes done as period pieces with earlier versions made during the same era. Another example: Farewell My Lovely (1975) was done as a 1940s period piece and sometimes over does the culture references compared with Murder My Sweet (1944), both based off the same Raymond Chandler novel.

We want to stress all of these observations are minor. The new Tinker, Tailor is worth the time of any spy fan and Gary Oldman is a wonderful successor to Alec Guiness (star of two television miniseries) as Smiley. Oldman did an NPR interview last year where he said he’d love to play Smiley again if the opportunity presents itself. We’ll second that thought.

(Belated) happy birthday to Luciana Paluzzi

June 10 was the birthday of Luciana Paluzzi, who played the femme fatale Fiona Volpe in Thunderball.

In the most recent issue of Her Majesty’s Secret Service, she was the sixth favorite Bond girl in a survey of HMSS editors and ranked as the hottest in that same survey.

Here’s one of the reasons why.

That was in 1965. Nine years later, she’d be reunited with director Terence Young in a movie called The Klansman. It didn’t get very good reviews (and didn’t help the reputations of stars Lee Marvin and Richard Burton), but if you want to check it out, you can CLICK RIGHT HERE.

Hitchcock directs Burton as Bond?

richard-burtonBurl Ives as “Henrico” Largo? Richard Burton as James Bond? Directed by Alfred Hitchcock??

“Liquidator65” has the whole story over at Jive Mofo, in a concise retelling of how the cinematic James Bond came to be, and Kevin McClory’s sisyphean efforts to create a parallel 007 film series.

Of course, we all know how things turned out, and are generally grateful for the outcome. On the other hand, Richard Burton as James Bond 007 in Alfred Hitchcock’s LONGITUDE 78 WEST sounds an intriguing notion.

Go, read and learn.