Margot Kidder dies at 69

Margot Kidder with Christopher Reeve in Superman (1978).

Margot Kidder, the definitive Lois Lane for a generation of movie goers, died over the weekend, according to an obituary posted by CNN. She was 69.

The actress “died peacefully in her sleep,” CNN reported, citing her manager.

Kidder first played Lois Lane in 1978’s Superman. Previous Superman productions were in the forms of modestly budgeted movie serials and television shows. The 1978 film, by contrast, was a big budget production. The movie had major stars — Marlon Brando and Gene Hackman among them.

But the leads were held by two relative unknowns, Christopher Reeve as Clark Kent/Superman and Kidder as Lois Lane. Kidder’s Lois was self confident, absolutely sure she would capture the big scoop. She would describe the play a story should receive in The Daily Planet while editor Perry White (Jackie Cooper) scanned her copy. “Only one ‘p’ in rapist,” White said on one occasion.

The Kidder version of Lois died, only to be revived when Superman reversed time in the 1978 movie. In Superman II (1981), the couple consummated their relationship after Lois discovered Clark was Superman. Clark had to renounce being Superman for a time but went back into action. He caused Lois to forget everything with a powerful kiss toward the end of the sequel.

Kidder’s career was a lot more than playing Lois Lane. During much of the 1970s, she had guest star roles on series such as Banacek, Barnaby Jones and Harry O. She moved into feature films such as The Great Waldo Pepper and The Reincarnation of Peter Proud.

Still, because Superman was such a major production — it helped set the stage for big-budget, comic book-based films — Kidder was remembered by audiences for the role.

As news of Kidder’s death spread, tributes appeared on social media.

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On Superman’s 80th, a few 007 connections

Christopher Reeve (right) with Roger Moore during filming of Octopussy.

This week marks the 80th anniversary of the introduction of Superman. DC Comics is out with Action Comics No. 1,000 to celebrate the occasion

The thing is, there are some elements in common, thanks to how the Christopher Reeve Superman movies were made at Pinewood Studios, the long-time home to the James Bond film franchise.

So here’s a few of them. It’s not a comprehensive list and I’m sure there are many stunt performers who worked on both.

Geoffrey Unsworth: Unsworth (1914-1978) was a celebrated cinematographer, whose credits included Superman (1978) and Superman II (1981), much of which was photographed at the same time as the film movie. Unsworth’s credits also included 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Unsworth also had a James Bond connection. On Dec. 21, 1961, he photographed screen tests for actresses vying to play Miss Taro for Dr. No.

John Glen: Glen directed five James Bond films, 1981-89, after earlier editing and being second unit director on three 007 films. He was one of the second unit directors for the 1978 Superman film.

Stuart Baird: Baird was editor on the first Superman movie. He performed the same duties on Casino Royale (2006) and Skyfall (2012).

Alf Joint: A stunt performer on the Bond series, perhaps his most famous bit was in the pre-titles of Goldfinger as Capungo, who gets killed by Bond (Sean Connery). He was also a stunt coordinator on Superman.

Shane Rimmer:  He had small roles in You Only Live Twice and Diamonds Are Forever while having a larger supporting role as a U.S. submarine captain in The Spy Who Loved Me. It also *sounds* like he does some voiceover work in the pre-titles of Live And Let Die as an agent who’s killed in New Orleans. (“Whose funeral is it?”)

He also played a NASA controller in Superman II. The IMDB listing for Superman III lists him as “State Policeman.” Truth be told, it’s been a long time since I’ve seen the movie, I can’t confirm.

Guy Hamilton: He directed four 007 films, two with Sean Connery and two with Roger Moore. He was signed to direct Superman but exited the project and replaced by Richard Donner.

(UPDATE 9:40 a.m., April 20): By popular demand, two more.

Tom Mankiewicz: The screenwriter of 1970s 007 films was credited as “creative consultant” in Superman and Superman II. He essentially rewrote the scripts, combining elements of very serious Mario Puzo drafts and much lighter drafts by David Newman and Leslie Newman.

Clifton James: The veteran actor, who played Sheriff J.W. Pepper in two Bond films, again played a sheriff in Superman II.