007 movies listed by number of tickets sold, 1995-present

Skyfall teaser poster

Skyfall teaser poster

The BOX OFFICE MOJO website has tools that let you look beyond unadjusted movie box office. You can also, for example, get a listing (for the U.S. and Canada, at least) of the estimated number of tickets sold.

There are various formulas for adjusting box office figures for inflation. But tickets sold is basic. So we decided to take a look back at the number of tickets sold for the eight 007 films of the past 20 years. Home video was firmly established, as opposed to the early years of the Bond series, where it didn’t exist and movies could get re-released.

Using this measure, 2012’s Skyfall, by far, sold the most tickets among 007 films in the region. After that, there’s less difference that the unadjusted box office figures might suggest.

What follows is each movie’s total U.S.-Canada tickets sold, with the number in parenthesis the number for its opening weekend. The average ticket price for each year is also listed. The total figure for SPECTRE is through Nov. 23.

GoldenEye (1995): 24,403,900 (6,024,100); average ticket price, $4.35

Tomorrow Never Dies (1997): 26,911,200 (5,477,800); average ticket price, $4.59

The World Is Not Enough (1999): 24,853,800 (6,991,900); average ticket price, $5.08

Die Another Day (2002): 27,584,000 (8,101,900); average ticket price, $5.81

Casino Royale (2006): 25,428,700 (6,234,100); average ticket price, $6.55

Quantum of Solace (2008): 23,449,600 (9,405,100); average ticket price, $7.18

Skyfall (2012): 37,842,000 (10,977,000); average ticket price, $7.96

SPECTRE (2015): 18,085,500, through Nov. 23, (8,176,900); average ticket price, $8.34

UPDATE: Out of curiosity, we went back to the earliest days of the series. Remember, these movies had re-releases, in some cases several re-releases. But in the cases of Goldfinger and Thunderball, you get an idea that Bond was a *very* big thing in the U.S. in the mid-1960s. Also, there was a big decline, relatively speaking, when You Only Live Twice came out. At the same time, Twice sold almost as many tickets in the U.S. and Canada as Skyfall did. Anyway, here’s a sampling:

Thunderball (1965): 74,800,000 (no opening weekend figure available)

Goldfinger (1964): 66,300,000

You Only Live Twice (1967): 35,904,000

On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (1969): 16,038,400

Diamonds Are Forever (1971): 26,557,300

Live And Let Die (1973): 19,987,500

Moonraker (1979): 28,011,200 (2,832,000 opening weekend)

Octopussy (1983): 21,553,500 (2,826,200)

Licence to Kill (1989): 8,732, 200 (2,210,300)

UPDATE II: To give that Thunderball figure some perspective, the top box office movie in the U.S. and Canada so far this year has been Jurassic World. It sold about 79 million tickets, according to Box Office Mojo. While comparisons that far apart are dicey, it’s fair to say Thunderball was in the same general league in its day. But before Bond fans brag too much, The Sound of Music (released the same year as Thunderball and also re-released several times), sold more than 142 million tickets.

SPECTRE U.S.-Canada weekend revised up to $15M


SPECTRE’s U.S. and Canadian box office for the Nov. 20-22 weekend was revised upward to $15 million, according to BOX OFFICE MOJO.

On Sunday, the 24th James Bond film had been projected to have a weekend box office of $14.6 million. The actual weekend figure was released Monday.

SPECTRE’s box office in the region now stands at $154.1 million through Sunday. Its global box office figure is $677.4 million.

For the weekend, the 007 film fell to the No. 2 slot behind The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2, which generated $102.7 million. That was up from a Sunday estimate of $101 million, but below projections of more than $120 million prior to the movie’s release.

SPECTRE slips to No. 2 in U.S.-Canada


SPECTRE came in No. 2 in the U.S. and Canada in its third weekend of release with an estimated $14.6 million, according to BOX OFFICE MOJO.

The 24th James Bond film finished behind The Hunger Games: Mokingjay Part 2 at $101 million. That movie had been projected for a weekend opening of more than $120 million, according to Variety. The Peanuts Movie, which opened the same weekend as SPECTRE, was No. 3 at $12.8 million.

SPECTRE’s estimate for this weekend was down 57 percent from last weekend’s $33.7 million. Final weekend figures will be released Monday.

SPECTRE was the top movie at the U.S.-Canada box office the past two weekends. The movie has generated an estimated $153.7 million in box office in the region since its Nov. 6 release.

Separately, Exhibitor Relations, which tracks movie box office, said IN A TWEET that SPECTRE’s worldwide box office is “over $670M.”

Variety HAS ESTIMATED SPECTRE needed to generate global ticket sales of $650 million to break even. The movie’s 007 predecessor, 2012’s Skyfall, had worldwide box office of $1.11 billion.

Here’s the Exhibitor Relations tweet:

UPDATE: The Hollywood Reporter puts SPECTRE’s worldwide box office at $677.8 million.

UPDATE II: We went back into the Box Office Mojo archives to look at the first three weekends in the U.S. and Canada for Skyfall and SPECTRE.

Skyfall: $88.4 million, $41.1 million, $35.5 million. The third weekend dropped only 14 percent from the second weekend. A drop of 50 percent is considered average.

SPECTRE: $70.4 million, $33.7 million, $14.6 million (estimate).

SPECTRE’s U.S.-Canada 2d weekend revised to $33.7 million

SPECTRE LOGOSPECTRE’s final figure for its second U.S.-Canada weekend was revised to $33.7 million, down from Sunday’s estimate of $35.4 million, according to BOX OFFICE MOJO.

The 24th James Bond film has now generated box office of $129 million in the region through Nov. 15, according to the movie box office website. That’s down from about $161 million for Skyfall for the comparable period in 2012.

SPECTRE has been the No. 1 box office movie for the U.S. and Canada the past two weekends. Skyfall was also No. 1 for two weekends — but not consecutive ones. In 2012, Skyfall was the No. 1 box office movie for the Nov. 9-11 weekend (its debut) and again during the Dec. 7-9 weekend (the film’s fifth weekend).

SPECTRE’s global box office has totaled more than $540 million through Nov. 15. That’s almost half way to Skyfall’s total of $1.11 billion.

SPECTRE has $73 million opening in U.S.-Canada

SPECTRE promotional art

SPECTRE promotional art

SPECTRE generated estimated box office of $73 million for the Nov. 6-8 weekend in the U.S. and Canada, according to BOX OFFICE MOJO

The 24th James Bond film was the No. 1 film for the weekend, which also includes Thursday night ticket sales. SPECTRE, despite higher ticket prices, was 17 percent lower than the $88.4 million opening of 2012’s Skyfall.

Three years ago, Skyfall was the only new movie in general release in the U.S. and Canada. Other new films out that weekend, such as Lincoln, were available only in limited release in a few cities. Skyfall also was the 50th anniversary 007 movie, and it enjoyed a big promotion from the 2012 Olympics, where the Opening Ceremonies included an elaborate James Bond skit, featuring Daniel Craig and Queen Elizabeth.

This time around, SPECTRE had more competition in the form of The Peanuts Movie, an animated film based on the comic strip, which had an estimated $45 million weekend.

Final figures for the weekend will be released on Monday.

Meanwhile, THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER reported that SPECTRE had a global weekend of “nearly $200 million” and its global box office so far is “north of $300 million.” The movie debuted late last month in the U.K.

Skyfall was the first Bond film to crack the billion-dollar-mark, with worldwide box office of $1.11 billion.

M:I Rogue Nation box office surges past $500M

Mission: Impossible Rogue Nation's teaser poster

Mission: Impossible Rogue Nation’s teaser poster

Mission: Impossible Rogue Nation’s worldwide box office surged past the $500 million mark this weekend.

The fifth installment of the series starring and produced by Tom Cruise was No. 4 at the U.S. box office for the Sept. 4-6 weekend with an estimated $7.15 million, according to data compiled by BOX OFFICE MOJO.

The movie’s total U.S. take is now an estimated $180.4 million, with estimated foreign box office of $328.7 million, for a combined total of more than $509 million.

M:I Rogue Nation originally was slated for Dec. 25, but Paramount moved up the film to July 31, getting it out of the way of Walt Disney Co.’s Star Wars: The Force Awakens, expected to be a huge hit.

The movie most affected by Paramount’s release switch was another spy film, The Man From U.N.C.L.E. The U.S. ticket sales for that film have stayed below M:I’s every week since U.N.C.L.E.’s Aug. 14 release.

U.N.C.L.E. finished No. 7 in the U.S. for the weekend, at $3.445 million. It’s now at $39.4 million in the U.S. and $85.4 million worldwide, according to Box Office Mojo. The movie still is being released internationally, including mid-September in France.

Avengers sequel has U.S. opening of ‘only’ $191 million

Avengers: Age of Ultron poster

Avengers: Age of Ultron poster

UPDATE (May 4): The actual box office figure came out today. It was a little better than the original estimate on Sunday — $191.3 million.

ORIGINAL POST (May 3) Avengers: Age of Ultron generated estimated U.S. ticket sales of $187.7 million, according to BOX OFFICE MOJO.COM.

That’s an enormous opening for any other movie, but it fell short of the $207.4 million opening of 2012’s Marvel’s The Avengers.

Movie box office figures are now covered similar to corporate earnings and monthly auto sales. The figures are gauged against expectations and projections. When the numbers exceed estimates, it’s written as a success. When the numbers fall short, they are often viewed as a disappointment.

According to the Los Angeles Times, “tracking” numbers indicated an opening of $190 million to $230 million.

When the movie didn’t make that level, there was some spinning to do, if this excerpt from the Times story is an indication.

The studio, however, adjusted its expectations on Saturday evening given several major competing events, including the Floyd Mayweather Jr.-Manny Pacquiao “fight of the century” in Las Vegas that kept some potential moviegoers in front of TV sets instead.

“Between the boxing match, NHL and NBA playoffs, the Kentucky Derby … looks like folks were distracted,” said Dave Hollis, Disney’s head of distribution. “But the second-biggest opening in history of movie business is something to be proud of and also just the beginning of what we expect to be a spectacular run.”

In a SEPARATE STORY, Ray Subers of Box Office Mojo wrote that repeating a $200 million-plus was going to be hard.

“In the years since the first movie’s opening, no other title has opened anywhere close to $200 million,” Subers wrote. “To make it that high required a perfect storm of factors, which Age of Ultron couldn’t quite replicate.”

Marvel still looks to have an overall financial success. The movie had an estimated production budget of $250 million. According to Box Office Mojo, its worldwide ticket sales are $626.7 million already. The general rule of thumb is that a movie needs to bring in about 2.5 times to 3 times its production budget to be profitable. The original Avengers movie had worldwide box office of $1.5 billion.

Marvel is an example of the corporate model of making films, which emphasizes planning and predictability. Avengers: Age of Ultron is the climax of Marvel’s “Phase Two” of films. The studio already has outlined films for “Phase Three,” which will culminate in a two-part Avengers movie being released in 2018 and 2019.


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