Fun with numbers: Most popular Bond in U.S.

Sean Connery in a 007 publicity still

Sean Connery in a 007 publicity still

Consider this post fun with numbers on a holiday: Who was the most popular James Bond in the United States when it comes to getting people to actually pay for a movie ticket?

If you guessed Sean Connery, the original film 007, you’re right and it’s not much of a surprise. But available statistics show how dominant the Scotsman was in the U.S. when it came to Bond movies.

On Box Office Mojo, you can find a list of Bond films by estimated number of tickets sold in the U.S. It has 25 films, the 24 made by Eon Productions plus 1983’s Never Say Never Again.

By that measure, Connery 007 films comprise five of the top 10 Bond movies.

In order: Thunderball (1), Goldfinger (2), You Only Live Twice (4), From Russia With Love (8) and Diamonds Are Forever (9).

In that top 10, two actors are tied at two apiece. Daniel Craig has Skyfall (3) and Casino Royale (10). Pierce Brosnan has Die Another Day (6) and Tomorrow Never Dies (7).

Rounding out the top 10 is Roger Moore with Moonraker (5).

Looking at the list, there’s a surprise or two.

Live And Let Die in 1973 and The Spy Who Loved Me in 1977 were big hits globally at the time of their release.

Live And Let Die, Moore’s debut and featuring a Paul McCartney title song, was the first Bond movie to exceed Thunderball at the worldwide box office. Spy re-energized the franchise after the split of producers Albert R. Broccoli and Harry Saltzman.

But on the U.S. list of ticket purchases, Spy shows up  at No. 16. It’s edged out by Octopussy at No. 15. Meanwhile, Live And Let Die is No. 17.

Curious about how George Lazenby and Timothy Dalton did? Well, Lazenby’s sole 007 effort, On Her Majesty’s Secret Service is No. 21. Dalton’s two Bond films come in at No. 23 (The Living Daylights) and No. 25 (Licence to Kill).

Finally, Connery isn’t completely invincible on this list. Dr. No, the first Bond film (which came to the U.S. in 1963) is No. 19. Never Say Never Again, Connery’s effort to do a Bond without Albert R. Broccoli, is No. 20.

If you’re a James Bond fan in general, or of a specific 007 actor, none of this should really matter.

Even when keeping it to tickets purchased, comparisons across decades are a dicey thing. For example, movie going habits have changed. In the 1960s, people went more often to the movies than they do now.

SEQUEL: 007 movies listed by number of tickets sold

Skyfall's poster image

Skyfall’s poster image

Last year, this blog published a post about how the last eight James Bond movies performed in number of tickets sold in the U.S. and Canada, 1995 to present.

Since that post ran, we now have the final figures for SPECTRE. No major changes in the conclusion. Bond movies  during this period — featuring two different Bond actors, Daniel Craig and Pierce Brosnan — sold between 23 million and 27 million tickets each.

The one exception was Skyfall with Craig, which was much higher.

Here’s the information again, with one change. Before, we listed the movies sequentially. Here, they’re listed highest to lowest, along with the average ticket price during the year of release. The information is from the BOX OFFICE MOJO website.

Skyfall (2012): 37,842,000/average ticket price $7.96

Die Another Day (2002): 27,584,000/$5.81

Tomorrow Never Dies (1997): 26,911,200/$4.59

Casino Royale (2006): 25,428,700/$6.55

The World Is Not Enough (1999): 24,853,800/$5.08

GoldenEye (1995): 24,403,900/$4.35

Quantum of Solace (2008): 23,449,600/$7.18

SPECTRE (2015): 23,001,900/$8.43

 

SPECTRE projected to finally pass $200M in U.S.-Canada

Daniel Craig in SPECTRE's main titles

Daniel Craig in SPECTRE’s main titles

SPECTRE is projected to finally pass the $200 million mark in the U.S. and Canada by the end of today, ACCORDING TO BOX OFFICE MOJO.

The website,which tracks box office performance, estimates the 24th James Bond film will finish the March 18-20 weekend with a cumulative total in the region of $200,002,111.

The movie’s estimated weekend total is $35,000 at just nine theaters, according to a Box Office Mojo chart.

SPECTRE has been in release for 136 days. That’s longer than its predecessor, Skyfall, which generated $304.4 million in U.S.-Canadian box office in 2012-13.

SPECTRE’s estimated worldwide total is $880.5 million.

UPDATE: At midday Saturday, Box Office Mojo listed SPECTRE’s U.S. box office as $3,000 for Friday, March 18. Today, IN THIS CHART,  the website has an estimate of $12,000 for March 18, $17,000 for March 19 and $6,000 for today. Those figures are subject to revision on Monday, when final figures for the weekend are due out.

SPECTRE U.S. box office update

SPECTRE LOGO

Because there are some posters on 007 message boards who are tracking this….

SPECTRE U.S.-Canada box office through March 16: $199,965,235 through Wednesday, March 16, its 132nd day of release.

That means that (through March 16), SPECTRE’s release time is 22 percent longer than Skyfall’s. SPECTRE’s U.S.-Canada box office is about one-third less than Skyfall ($304.4 million).

Source: BOX OFFICE MOJO.

UPDATE (March 18): SPECTRE will be in U.S. theaters for another week, but its theater count is now down to nine from 16. CLICK HERE for a chart.

Also, through March 17, SPECTRE’s U.S.-Canadian box office is $199,967,111. By this point, it seems obvious Sony will keep the movie in release until it passes $200 million no matter how long it takes.

SPECTRE leads Skyfall in one U.S. box office category

Daniel Craig in SPECTRE's main titles

Daniel Craig in SPECTRE’s main titles

We took a deeper look at the U.S.-Canada box office numbers for SPECTRE, comparing them to Skyfall. There is one surprise. All figures via Box Office Mojo.

DAYS IN RELEASE: 129 (and counting), for SPECTRE, 108 for Skyfall.

Or, put another way, the 24th James Bond film has been in U.S.-Canadian theaters three weeks longer than the 23rd.

Since Friday, SPECTRE has been available on 16 screens in the region. Skyfall, in its last weekend in release (Feb. 22-24, 2013) was on 184 screens.

BOX OFFICE TOTALS: $304.4 million for Skyfall. $199,954,501 (estimated as of Sunday) for SPECTRE. The latter includes an estimated $47,000 for the March 11-13 weekend. SPECTRE’s global box office now stands at an estimated $880.4 million.

NUMBER OF TICKETS SOLD U.S.-Canada:  37.842,000 for Skyfall,  22,983,300 for SPECTRE.

Given the box office, that’s not a surprise. This may be: SPECTRE has sold fewer tickets than 2008’s Quantum of Solace, 23,449,600.

 

You know the name, you know the number(s)

SPECTRE LOGO

At this point a logo and the numbers should be sufficient.

$30,000 (+50%)

$199,885,714

63 (-29)

Source: BOX OFFICE MOJO.

SPECTRE hangs in at U.S. theaters

SPECTRE teaser poster

SPECTRE teaser poster

Believe it or not, SPECTRE is still around some theaters in the U.S. and Canada almost a month after the 24th James Bond film became available on home video.

According to BOX OFFICE MOJO, SPECTRE is in 63 theaters in the region starting March 4, down 29 from the week before. It was in 47 theaters the week starting Feb. 12 before ballooning up to 340 the week starting Feb. 19 because of a “buy one, get one free” SPECTRE ticket promotion at AMC Theaters.

Meanwhile, SPECTRE has been out long enough on home video that Wal Mart (which emphasizes low prices) is starting to mark down its price. For example, the retailer’s website lists the movie’s Blu Ray and Digital HD pack at $19.96, down from a list price of $39.99.

Fans have speculated on 007 message boards that Sony Pictures, which released SPECTRE, is keeping the movie in theaters so it can achieve $200 million box office in the U.S. and Canada.

Through Thursday, SPECTRE’s box office in the region stood at $199,855,714. On Thursday, it had $2,711 in its 119th day of release.