New SPECTRE poster unveiled, Craig listed as co-producer

New SPECTRE poster

New SPECTRE poster

The official 007 WEBSITE unveiled a new SPECTRE poster, featuring star Daniel Craig in a white dinner jacket as well listing the actor as a co-producer of the 24th James Bond film.

Craig has long been described as more involved in creative matters than other 007 actors. The co-producer credit is a confirmation of that. The other co-producers are Andrew Noakes and David Pope.

To easier read the credits, click on the image and a bigger version should appear.

The poster also disclosed a long writing credit.

The credits for the poster say the screenplay is by “John Logan and Neal Purvis & Robert Wade and Jez Butterworth,” while the plot is by Logan, Purvis and Wade.

Butterworth’s involvement came to light last fall when he was featured in a profile by The New Yorker magazine. The article said Butterworth had also contributed to the script of 2012’s Skyfall.

Butterworth didn’t get a credit for Skyfall. The SPECTRE credit indicates his contribution are greater this time around.

Logan originally wrote SPECTRE solo, but was replaced in the summer of 2014 by Purvis and Wade.  The “story by” credit is an indication that Purvis and Wade substantially revamped the story line Logan first submitted in March 2014.

UPDATE: “One more thing,” as Lt. Columbo used to say. Based on the poster, it appears the co-bosses of Eon Productions, Michael G. Wilson and Barbara Broccoli, have opted to not have the “p.g.a.” mark.

That label, or “producer’s mark,” is from the Producers Guild of America, and has been in use since mid-2013 to indicate who the primary producers are for a movie. The guild sought this with the proliferation of producer credits. The mark is voluntary but has been used widely in films the past two years. Apparently, Wilson and Broccoli felt it wasn’t necessary in their case.

1998: the Purvis & Wade era begins

The World Is Not Enough poster

The World Is Not Enough poster

Neal Purvis and Robert Wade, at six movies and counting, are No. 2 among credited 007 screenwriters, behind only Richard Maibaum at 13. Their tenure began with a first draft script for The World Is Not Enough, submitted June 15, 1998.

The title page says the draft is based on an idea by Maibaum. The copy this blog got from Bond collector Gary Firuta has The World Is Not Enough on the title page, though it’s referred to as Bond 19 on subsequent pages.

The script weighs in at 109 pages. The rule-of-thumb for scripts is they average out at one minute of running time per page. The final movie, released in November 1999, was 128 minutes. The first draft would eventually be rewritten separately by Dana Stevens and Bruce Feirstein. Feirstein would share the screenplay credit with Purvis and Wade.

Overall, the 1998 first draft is closer to the final product than either Michael France’s first draft for GoldenEye or Feirstein’s first draft for Tomorrow Never Dies. There are still significant differences, but the basic plot and many set pieces are present in the initial effort by Purvis and Wade.

The pre-credits sequence of the first draft is similar to the final movie with a couple of major differences. It opens in Havana, instead of Bilbao, Spain. Later, in London, Bond takes off after the woman assassin with a jet pack instead of the gadget-laden Q boat.

Bond uses the jet pack to get ahead of the woman assassin in her boat. She spots him “minus jet pack, standing at the front of a moored ship, feet apart, poised to start firing.” The two fire at each other. She’s hit and “crashes into the side of the ship.”

This sets up a bit of a cliffhanger as an explosion ensues “lighting up the evening sky, enveloping James Bond and burning us into our….TITLES.”

Of course, Bond survives (it’d be a short movie it he didn’t), but after the titles we see a funeral. It takes an exchange between M and Bill Tanner to establish it’s the funeral for businessman Robert King (thus establishing it’s not 007’s funeral). We don’t actually see Bond until the next scene.

In this draft, Q is around for a bit longer than in the final film, which would be actor Desmond Llewelwyn’s final appearance in the role. There’s no “R,” the Q deputy John Cleese would play. There’s also no sign of Robinson, the aide to M who debuted in Tomorrow Never Dies. As a result, Tanner gets more dialogue.

The woman doctor Bond gets to clear him for duty is named Greatrex instead of Molly Warmflash.

The character of Christmas Jones is present, but there’s a bit of a difference. Here, she’s  a “BEAUTIFUL FRENCH POLYNESIAN GIRL,” and “is a mid-twenties, shortish hair, hot right now.”  She also speaks with a French accent.

Her entrance is much like the final movie. When she gets out of protective suit she has “a khaki sports bra, similar shorts, heavy duty boots. Deep tan, incredible figure. Totally unselfconscious.” The part ended up going to American actress Denise Richards.

The biggest structural difference in this draft compared with the movie is that M stays put and doesn’t go out into the field. Thus, M is never kidnapped and put into peril. Later versions of the script added that element, which would be the start of the trend where Judi Dench’s M leaves the office a lot to deal with Bond away from MI6 headquarters. That became a way for the series to provide more screen time for the Oscar-winning actress.

Finally, the first draft — similar to Bruce Feirstein’s first draft for Tomorrow Never Dies — makes occasional references to earlier 007 films.

Besides the jet pack (a nod to Thunderball) in the pre-titles sequence, Bond initially travels to see Elektra King posing as David Somerset (an alias Bond used in From Russia With Love). Here, the David Somerset cover is supposed to be a public relations expert in crisis communications.

Anyway, for Purvis and Wade this was just the start. The duo have made five 007 encores, including SPECTRE, the 24th 007 film that comes out this fall. With SPECTRE, the duo revised drafts by John Logan.

 

 

“Retcon”: For Your Eyes Only now official SPECTRE movie

Blofeld (apparently we can actually call him that now) menaces 007 at the start of For Your Eyes Only

Blofeld (apparently we can actually call him that now) menaces 007 at the start of For Your Eyes Only

The James Bond film series has done what’s known in comic books as a “retcon” — or retroactive change in continuity. It appears 1981’s For Your Eyes Only is now officially considered a SPECTRE-related movie.

When did this happen? Today when the official 007 site today announced A HOME VIDEO RELEASE in connection with the 24th James Bond film.

Here’s the start of the press release:

As fans prepare for the November 6th release of SPECTRE, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios (MGM) and Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment will release an all-new line-up of special edition Blu-rays, DVDs and box-sets on September 15th.

Two never-before-seen featurettes are included with interviews from Bond writers Neal Purvis and Robert Wade. “The Shadow of SPECTRE” will recount the fictional history of the global criminal syndicate and terrorist organization, “The Story So Far” will provide an overview of Daniel Craig’s first three Bond movies.

Six films featuring the SPECTRE organization (FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE, THUNDERBALL, YOU ONLY LIVE TWICE, ON HER MAJESTY’S SECRET SERVICE, DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER, FOR YOUR EYES ONLY) and the three recent Daniel Craig titles (CASINO ROYALE, QUANTUM OF SOLACE, SKYFALL) will each get a limited edition Blu-ray Steelbook release, their cover designs inspired by each film’s opening title sequence. (emphasis added)

Interestingly, at the time of its release, 1981’s For Your Eyes Only wasn’t considered a SPECTRE related film. Its pre-titles sequence features a wheelchair-bound villain who looked like Ernst Stavro Blofeld but wasn’t identified as such.

The script, by Richard Maibaum and Michael G. Wilson, had a line where the villain notes this is the 10th anniversary of his last encounter with Bond. That would appear to be a veiled reference to 1971’s Diamonds Are Forever. The line was cut from the movie but appears in the Marvel Comics adaptation.

At the time, Kevin McClory still held the film rights to Thunderball and he claimed ownership of the Blofeld character.

Presumably, with Danjaq LLC and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer in 2013 obtaining all of the 007 rights held by McClory’s estate, all of that is moot now. Voila, For Your Eyes Only’s story has been changed.

One other note: Dr. No, the first 007 film, was also SPECTRE related because Dr. No was a member of the criminal organization. However, Blofeld didn’t put in an appearance, probably explaining why it’s not listed as part of this package.

FWIW: Daily Mail claims Daniel Craig rewriting SPECTRE

SPECTRE teaser poster

SPECTRE teaser poster

Presented strictly for entertainment value: The U.K. Daily Mail IN A GOSSIP COLUMN BY SEBASTIAN SHAKESPEARE posted June 19, claims that SPECTRE star Daniel Craig has been doing some personal rewriting of SPECTRE’s script.

Here’s an excerpt:

I hear that the 47-year-old actor has been rewriting the script of 007’s latest outing, Spectre, even though filming has been going on since December.
‘The script is still all over the place, to the extent that Daniel himself has had a bash at rewriting it,’ says my man with the vodka martinis. ‘It’s total creative turmoil.’

To be clear, the Daily Mail has a journalistic reputation that would be tactfully described as uneven. However, the U.K. publication has published a number of 007 scoops proven to be correct. On the other hand, most of those were written by Baz Bamigboye, who has been MIA (as far as 007 stories are concerned) since SPECTRE went into production Dec. 8.

The only reason we mention this is because SPECTRE has had a dicey scripting process. The first writer was John Logan. Because of the Sony hacking, it’s now known Logan’s initial efforts contained some questionable ideas.

Logan was replaced by 007 veterans Neal Purvis and Robert Wade (something that Bamigboye originally reported last year), with some polishes by playwright by Jez Butterworth.

Also, it should be noted that Craig said in 2011 he and director Marc Forster did uncredited rewrites for 2008’s Quantum of Solace.

Bleeding Cool discloses SPECTRE spoilers from WikiLeaks

SPECTRE LOGO

No spoilers in the text of the post, but obviously links to something full of spoilers.

That didn’t take long.

The Bleeding Cool website PUBLISHED A LONG POST extensively quoting from hacked Sony Pictures e-mails concerning SPECTRE, the 24th James Bond film.

Bleeding Cool examined the e-mails after WiliLeaks published a searchable database of the material hacked from Sony last year. Sony will release SPECTRE in November, which is why the 007 material was included in the hack.

The Bleeding Cool post contains references to early script drafts by John Logan and later rewrites by Neal Purvis and Robert Wade.

Generally (and to phrase this in a non-spoiler way), the quoted e-mails give the reader how extensively the story changed. Some characters from earlier drafts disappear from later ones. There’s a lot of discussion from various executives about what the villains should be doing.

Even the title is spoiler-related (it concerns something from an earlier draft). So, if you click on the link above, just remember you can’t un-see what you read.

Dissecting the SPECTRE teaser trailer

SPECTRE teaser poster

SPECTRE teaser poster

By Nicolás Suszczyk, Guest Writer

This post originally appeared in Portuguese on the Pipoca Gigante website. People who consider trailers as spoilers should not read.

The arrival of the teaser trailer is one of the most awaited moments for James Bond fans every time a new film is produced. It’s the first actual glimpse of the upcoming film and it gives you an idea of what awaits.

On the evening of Friday, March 27, the countdown on the official James Bond site reached zero and fans from around the world got the first look at SPECTRE, set for a November release.

The tradition of the 007 teaser trailers has changed as much as the movie plots. Back in the 1960s and 1970s we had the high-sounding coming attractions shouting JAMES BOND IS BACK, showcasing much of the action sequences of the film and the name of the star, SEAN CONNERY or ROGER MOORE in big and bold capital letters, as well as many of the members of the cast being mentioned.

This tradition slowed down by the times of Pierce Brosnan, whose James Bond era started with GoldenEye in 1995. Teaser trailers were less extravagant, yet they focused in the action scenes, the witty lines and –- in a more discrete way –- the name of the actor playing Bond either had a credit or was mentioned in the narrations.

One of the key elements of the Brosnan era teaser trailers were the narrations: “Some men want to rule the world, but for one man… The World is not Enough,” claimed the trailer for the 1999 blockbuster directed by Michael Apted.

As Daniel Craig took over the role in 2006 with Casino Royale, a grittier approach was taken with shots of the film’s action sequences or Bond’s emotional reactions. 2012’s Skyfall gave little away about the film’s plot and its highlight was 007’s admission test with a therapist who provokes a stone-faced reaction of the spy when he mentions the film’s title during a word-association exercise. That, of course, led to the usual flashes of action sequences.

SPECTRE is particularly interesting because the teaser trailer breaks a tradition. There are no action scenes at all.

The focus is on the mysterious past of James Bond and a few ties with the Skyfall case: personal effects on found on the ruins of 007’s childhood residence show he had a secret. “something you can’t tell anyone, because you don’t trust anyone”, in the words of Naomie Harris’ Miss Moneypenny.

We can see 007 exploring some papers including an authorization of guardianship when he was 12 (dated January 21, 1983 – so we assume Bond was born in 1971) and a photo of him in a snowy place with an elderly man and another older stepbrother whose face isn’t clearly seen since the photo survived the lodge’s explosions.

We’re meant to believe this is also related to the film’s villain, Oberhauser, played by Cristoph Waltz. In the short story Octopussy, Ian Fleming specifies a man called Hannes Oberhauser taught James Bond to ski during his teens and as a matter of fact the secret agent is sent to settle the score with the man who apparently shot him, one Major Dexter Smythe (this is also briefly mentioned and modified in the 1983 film with the same name).

As many Bond enthusiasts know, screenwriters Neal Purvis and Robert Wade have always borrowed Fleming materials since they started working on the series in The World is not Enough, so it won’t be strange something of this material would make an appearance in SPECTRE.

The following shots, besides highlighting Hoyte van Hoytema’s cinematography, contain quite a few references to the previous Bond films.

As 007 enters an abandoned cabin two crows quickly fly next to him, a quick reminder of director John Glen’s trademark every time a dove disturbed Bond when climbing a building or a mountain (see For your eyes only and Licence to Kill). Then the spy meets an old enemy, Mr. White, the character Jesper Christensen played in two previous Daniel Craig films, Casino Royale and his follow-up Quantum of Solace.

The man, leader of the Quantum criminal organization and responsible of the suicide of Bond’s short-time girlfriend Vesper Lynd (Eva Green), is seen in the misery: beardy, tired and ragged. He’s playing chess, apparently alone, which could be considered as a reference to 1963’s From Russia with Love where SPECTRE agent Kronsteen (Vladek Sheybal) is a chess master and uses his intellect to plan Bond’s assassination.

“You’re a kite dancing on a hurricane, Mr. Bond”, says White as 007 shows him a more discreet version of the classic octopus ring that identified the organization the film is named after.

We understand, as many sources pointed out, that this movie would tie the stories and sub-plots started in the three previous films, such as Vesper’s death (Casino Royale), the Quantum organization (Quantum of Solace) and the passing of Judi Dench’s M (Skyfall).

The very last minutes of the teaser trailer are a clear reference to the SPECTRE meeting in Thunderball (1965), where Ernst Stavro Blofeld leads a meeting of his operatives in Paris. The image of Oberhauser, with his face hidden in the shadows, echoes the days where Blofeld’s face wasn’t seen leaving the audiences only with a shot of his hands stroking the white cat.

“Welcome, James. It’s been a long time. But finally, here we are,” Oberhauser says during an Illuminati-esque board meeting of the organization that Bond seems to infiltrate after –- or before -– attending a funeral where Monica Bellucci’s character Lucia Sciarra is seen. Curiously enough, in Thunderball Blofeld mentioned to his agents the death of another SPECTRE member, Colonel Jacques Boitier. Would be that a SPECTRE funeral, maybe?

As the countdown to the film’s release starts, producer Michael G. Wilson told reporters he aimed to construct this teaser trailer as “a puzzle”. Without doubt, he accomplished this effect with great success.

Nicolás Suszczyk is editor of The GoldenEye Dossier.

Here’s the trailer if you haven’t seen it:

UPDATED: Wilson and Broccoli comment about SPECTRE

SPECTRE teaser image

SPECTRE teaser image

No real spoilers, although the super spoiler adverse should probably stay away just in case.

UPDATE (March 31): The COLLIDER WEBSITE quotes Michael G. Wilson differently about the script than IGN does below.

Here’s how Collider quotes Wilson about when the script originated:  “Almost three years ago, two and a half certainly. The first draft of ideas, treatments.”

That would make a lot more sense than the quote from IGN which makes it sound like the first draft was done two and a half years ago. It was first reported in fall 2012 that John Logan had been hired (which MGM confirmed in November 2012). Logan had to have submitted some material by that time. Collider’s quotes of Wilson certainly are more consistent with the known background of the development of SPECTRE’s script.

ORIGINAL POST (March 29): Michael G. Wilson and Barbara Broccoli, the co-bosses of Eon Productions, talked to reporters in Mexico City as part of a press junket for SPECTRE, the 24th James Bond film.

IGN HAS A TRANSCRIPT of what the SPECTRE producers said.

Wilson said SPECTRE won’t be a two-part movie. “I suppose people feel that — there’s been a lot of films now that seem to not want to stop, and yet they double themselves up to make two movies,” he’s quoted by IGN as saying. “But that’s not the case here.”

The duo were asked when they would starting “thinking about” Bond 25. Wilson deferred to Broccoli. She respoded, “Yeah, I think so much focus is on what we’re doing at the moment that the next movie seems very far away.”

Eventually, the producers were asked about SPECTRE’s script and how long it has been around.”

Wilson’s reply comes on THE SECOND PAGE OF THE STORY: “Almost three years. Two and a half, certainly — the first draft. No idea as far as treatments.”

Using Wilson’s two-and-a-half year comment, the first draft was done around September 2012, or before Skyfall was released in the fall of 2012. The hiring of John Logan, initially hired to write solo what would become SPECTRE, wasn’t even announced until November 2012 (it occurred during a Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer investor call). A few days before that announcement, Broccoli, TALKING TO CRAVE ONLINE, denied that Logan had even been hired,

Logan told EMPIRE MAGAZINE IN MARCH 2014 that the first draft was “almost done.” Neal Purvis and Robert Wade were hired in the summer of 2014 to rewrite Logan’s work.

Also, concerning who would perform the movie’s title song, Broccoli said, “We’re still figuring that out. That’s one of the last pieces in the puzzle, but it’s one of the fun things we look forward to. So it’ll be awhile.”

In December, director Sam Mendes he already knew who the title song performer would be. The director didn’t disclose the singer’s identity.

To read the entire IGN transcript, CLICK HERE for page one, CLICK HERE for page two. Other subjects include how 1,500 extras in Mexico City will be “duplicated” to look like 10,000 people, director Sam Mendes, how Naomie Harris’s Moneypenny won’t be “desk-bound,” Idris Elba and that star Daniel Craig’s contract is “open ended.”

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 201 other followers